Modèles analytiques et évaluation de performances dans les grands réseaux mobiles ad hoc.

Abstract : In this thesis, we study different aspects of communication protocols for mobile ad hoc networks. Our goal is to provide analytical models for each of these aspects and to combine the models in order to evaluate the entire system's performance. We consider protocols of all layers starting from medium access control. We begin our study with the IEEE 802.11 protocol and we show via analytical means that the channel access delays follow an asymptotic power law distribution. Based on this result, we discuss a cross-layer protocol with the goal to provide delay based QoS guarantees in multi-hop wireless networks. The next topic involves the scalability of link state routing protocols in massive ad hoc networks. We compare theoretical results on the capacity of wireless networks with the achievable bounds when we take into account the protocol operation and overhead. We adapt the information theoretic bounds to multicast communications and we propose MOST, a protocol for multicast routing which yields optimal performance in the asymptotic case of large ad hoc networks. We then study the behavior of TCP and the impact of the heavy tailed delays observed previously in TCP tra c autocorrelations, again in the context of large networks. In the final part we are concerned with network management and organization, in order to provide user services satisfying QoS constraints. We take here a more general approach regarding the network setting, which consists in placing replicated servers in appropriate locations, based on QoS information obtained from lower layers. In this thesis, we study different aspects of communication protocols for mobile ad hoc networks. Our goal is to provide analytical models for each of these aspects and to combine the models in order to evaluate the entire system's performance. We consider protocols of all layers starting from medium access control. We begin our study with the IEEE 802.11 protocol and we show via analytical means that the channel access delays follow an asymptotic power law distribution. Based on this result, we discuss a cross-layer protocol with the goal to provide delay based QoS guarantees in multi-hop wireless networks. The next topic involves the scalability of link state routing protocols in massive ad hoc networks. We compare theoretical results on the capacity of wireless networks with the achievable bounds when we take into account the protocol operation and overhead. We adapt the information theoretic bounds to multicast communications and we propose MOST, a protocol for multicast routing which yields optimal performance in the asymptotic case of large ad hoc networks. We then study the behavior of TCP and the impact of the heavy tailed delays observed previously in TCP tra c autocorrelations, again in the context of large networks. In the final part we are concerned with network management and organization, in order to provide user services satisfying QoS constraints. We take here a more general approach regarding the network setting, which consists in placing replicated servers in appropriate locations, based on QoS information obtained from lower layers. In this thesis, we study different aspects of communication protocols for mobile ad hoc networks. Our goal is to provide analytical models for each of these aspects and to combine the models in order to evaluate the entire system's performance. We consider protocols of all layers starting from medium access control. We begin our study with the IEEE 802.11 protocol and we show via analytical means that the channel access delays follow an asymptotic power law distribution. Based on this result, we discuss a cross-layer protocol with the goal to provide delay based QoS guarantees in multi-hop wireless networks. The next topic involves the scalability of link state routing protocols in massive ad hoc networks. We compare theoretical results on the capacity of wireless networks with the achievable bounds when we take into account the protocol operation and overhead. We adapt the information theoretic bounds to multicast communications and we propose MOST, a protocol for multicast routing which yields optimal performance in the asymptotic case of large ad hoc networks. We then study the behavior of TCP and the impact of the heavy tailed delays observed previously in TCP tra c autocorrelations, again in the context of large networks. In the final part we are concerned with network management and organization, in order to provide user services satisfying QoS constraints. We take here a more general approach regarding the network setting, which consists in placing replicated servers in appropriate locations, based on QoS information obtained from lower layers. In this thesis, we study different aspects of communication protocols for mobile ad hoc networks. Our goal is to provide analytical models for each of these aspects and to combine the models in order to evaluate the entire system's performance. We consider protocols of all layers starting from medium access control. We begin our study with the IEEE 802.11 protocol and we show via analytical means that the channel access delays follow an asymptotic power law distribution. Based on this result, we discuss a cross-layer protocol with the goal to provide delay based QoS guarantees in multi-hop wireless networks. The next topic involves the scalability of link state routing protocols in massive ad hoc networks. We compare theoretical results on the capacity of wireless networks with the achievable bounds when we take into account the protocol operation and overhead. We adapt the information theoretic bounds to multicast communications and we propose MOST, a protocol for multicast routing which yields optimal performance in the asymptotic case of large ad hoc networks. We then study the behavior of TCP and the impact of the heavy tailed delays observed previously in TCP tra c autocorrelations, again in the context of large networks. In the final part we are concerned with network management and organization, in order to provide user services satisfying QoS constraints. We take here a more general approach regarding the network setting, which consists in placing replicated servers in appropriate locations, based on QoS information obtained from lower layers. In this thesis, we study different aspects of communication protocols for mobile ad hoc networks. Our goal is to provide analytical models for each of these aspects and to combine the models in order to evaluate the entire system's performance. We, consider protocols of all layers starting from medium access control. We begin our study with the IEEE 802.11 protocol and we show via analytical means that the channel access delays follow an asymptotic power law distribution. Based on this result, we discuss a cross-layer protocol with the goal to provide delay based QoS guarantees in multi-hop wireless networks. The next topic involves the scalability of link state routing protocols in massive ad hoc networks. We compare theoretical results on the capacity of wireless networks with the achievable bounds when we take into account the protocol operation and overhead. We adapt the information theoretic bounds to multicast communications and we propose MOST, a protocol for multicast routing which yields optimal performance in the asymptotic case of large ad hoc networks. We then study the behavior of TCP and the impact of the heavy tailed delays observed previously in TCP tra c autocorrelations, again in the context of large networks. In the final part we are concerned with network management and organization, in order to provide user services satisfying QoS constraints. We take here a more general approach regarding the network setting, which consists in placing replicated servers in appropriate locations, based on QoS information obtained from lower layers. In this thesis, we study different aspects of communication protocols for mobile ad hoc networks. Our goal is to provide analytical models for each of these aspects and to combine the models in order to evaluate the entire system's performance. We consider protocols of all layers starting from medium access control. We begin our study with the IEEE 802.11 protocol and we show via analytical means that the channel access delays follow an asymptotic power law distribution. Based on this result, we discuss a cross-layer protocol with the goal to provide delay based QoS guarantees in multi-hop wireless networks. The next topic involves the scalability of link state routing protocols in massive ad hoc networks. We compare theoretical results on the capacity of wireless networks with the achievable bounds when we take into account the protocol operation and overhead. We adapt the information theoretic bounds to multicast communications and we propose MOST, a protocol for multicast routing which yields optimal performance in the asymptotic case of large ad hoc networks. We then study the behavior of TCP and the impact of the heavy tailed delays observed previously in TCP tra c autocorrelations, again in the context of large networks. In the final part we are concerned with network management and organization, in order to provide user services satisfying QoS constraints. We take here a more general approach regarding the network setting, which consists in placing replicated servers in appropriate locations, based on QoS information obtained from lower layers.
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Theses
Computer Science. Ecole Polytechnique X, 2006. French


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Submitted on : Wednesday, July 28, 2010 - 10:33:05 AM
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Georgios Rodolakis. Modèles analytiques et évaluation de performances dans les grands réseaux mobiles ad hoc.. Computer Science. Ecole Polytechnique X, 2006. French. <pastel-00002950>

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